CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH REPORTS

IEA Clean Coal Centre provides unbiased information on the clean and efficient use of coal world-wide, including subjects related to clean coal technology. Funded by member countries and industrial sponsors IEA CCC products include in-depth topical reports available in PDF form, a range of workshop series, the Clean Coal Technologies Conference, and online databases of coal information and resources. IEA CCC also provides direct advice, facilitation of R & D and networks.

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Coal beneficiation, CCC/278

Research Report: CCC/278

Up till now the power industry has largely met the demand to increase efficiency and reduce emissions by improving boiler technology and post combustion emission treatment. However, feedstock quality is a key element to improve coal power plant performance. The preparation of coal to remove inert matter and reduce contaminants can benefit every aspect of power plant operation. This report reviews a broad range of technical developments in coal beneficiation covering conventional, physical dense-media and dry coal treatment, upgrading technologies using thermal, chemical and bio-oxidation, coal blending, and applications for the use of ultrafine coal and waste streams.
Lignite power generation normally utilises raw feedstock resulting in significant energy and reliability penalties; the report discusses energy efficient technologies that reduce moisture and ash levels.
The direct injection coal engine (DICE) may have the potential to compete with diesel fuel as a source of compact flexible power generation, offering a rapid response to complement intermittent renewable energy generation. Suitable coal sources and preparation methods are discussed for the production of micronised refined carbon (MRC) fuels, with specific formulations that overcome issues associated with coal water slurry fuels.


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